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Anthony Greene

Assistant Professor, African American Studies

Address: Education Center, Room 206-D
Phone: 843.953.1018
E-mail: greenead@cofc.edu


Dr. Anthony D. Greene is an Assistant Professor of African American Studies. Dr. Greene specializes in race-ethnic relations, cultural and ethnic identity, and Sociology of Education. He has taught and conducted research on topics that include comparative Black identity, race-ethnic relations, Sociology of sport, academic tracking, school desegregation, and student achievement among disadvantaged minorities.


Education

Dr. Greene received his B.A. in Sociology and African American Studies from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in Charlotte, NC. He also received his M.A. in Sociology from UNC Charlotte.  He earned his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Miami in 2008.  Dr. Greene previously held a position at UNC Charlotte in the Department of Sociology.


Research Interests

Dr. Greene’s current areas of research include social class, cultural, and ethnic identity among Black student populations. Two recent works center around Black identity among African American and Caribbean Black populations.  His most recent work investigates how the perception of discrimination impacts social psychological factors (i.e. social anxiety, depressive symptoms, self-esteem) among Black subgroups in the U.S. 


Courses Taught

AAST 200 - Introduction to African American Studies

AAST 300 - Special Topics: Race-Ethnic Relations


Honors and Awards

  • 2010  Outstanding Faculty Award Nominee – University of North Carolina at Charlotte Annual Black Student Union Awards.

  • 2009  Greek Excellence in Teaching Award – University of North Carolina at Charlotte Annual Faculty Recognition Awards, Office of Student Affairs: Greek Life.

  • 2007  Outstanding Teacher Assistant Award – University of Miami, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Sociology.


Publications

Dr. Greene’s forthcoming article Get Up, Get Out, & Git Sumthin’: How Race and Class Infleunce African Americans Attitudes about Inequality, is a co-authored piece lead by Dr. Jason E. Shelton at the University of Texas-Arlington.  Currently, there are two recent works that center around Black identity among African Americans and Caribbean Black populations.  His most recent work investigates how the perception of discrimination impacts social psychological factors (i.e. social anxiety, depressive symptoms, self-esteem) among Black subgroups in the U.S.